Steps To Take In Designing A Baby’s Room

More often than not, parents start off with a blank palette when it comes to designing their nurseries. In essence, the power is in your hands. One of the most important things is measuring the dimensions of the room and windows and the like. Apart from that, color is the next most important thing. But when we don’t know whether it’s going to be a boy or a girl, we have to stick with neutral colors.

baby bed attached to parents bedIf you are using neutral colors, don’t worry, as you can still use various accessories that will work with either gender. Pillows, ladybug baby bedding, accent rugs and other similar things will really help to tie in the room. In addition to that, you can use wall hangings and other decorative ideas that won’t cause any damage to your walls. For example, wallpaper, wallpaper Borders, and other designs that are hung on the walls can easily be removed. Then it’s time to choose the furniture.

Many parents seem very content with the convertible crib. It’s simply because although it starts off as a crib, it can be converted into a small bed. Therefore, you don’t have to buy a new bed for your baby when he outgrows the crib.

Additionally, convertible baby crib white furniture might be the right option for you. It’s less expensive than other furniture, so it won’t hurt as much when you want to redecorate the room when your child grows. In most cases, baby furniture really takes a licking when your baby grows into a toddler and bangs toys and the like into them.

In decorating the nursery, you should know that you can do it wisely and on a decent budget. But, it is recommended that you look around to see what’s available and find some ideas. Magazines and online resources can certainly help.

Take some time to look around and see what really inspires you. Try to avoid filling the nursery with teddy bears and other stuff animals as they only collect dust. One or two will suffice. In addition to that, you want to look at filling the room with the things that you will need for your baby. Try to organize the space properly with all the necessities being close at hand, but out of the reach of the baby.

When they grow out of this furniture, redecorating to make it age-appropriate is recommended. When you do so, ask them for their ideas and try to work together with them.

The professional company stlouisinsulation provides all the information on Spray Foam Insulation.

There was 3 ways you got a hat at the Gold Bar Room Theater.
1. Celebrity
2. Paid for 5 shows a season.
or
3.  An Imperial Player performer.

********PLEASE NOTE
This page is always being up dated as to new information always coming in.  Your input is always welcome, just go to the home page and my email address is listed.  Thank you.
George
1523067

Lt Gen John H. Hay Jr.

2719386The qualifications of Lieutenant General John H. Hay, Jr. , to write Tactical and Materiel Innovations are considerable. After graduating from the Advanced Management Program at Harvard University, General Hay served as the Army Member, Military Studies and Liaison Division, Weapons Systems Evaluation Group, Office of the Secretary of Defense, from December 1962 to June 1964. General Hay was then assigned as the Commanding General, Berlin Brigade , in West Berlin, Germany, from July 1964 until August 1966, at which time he became the Commanding General, 11th Infantry Brigade, U.S. Army, Pacific, September 1966-January 1967. In February 1967 he became the Commanding General of the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam and held this position until March 1968, when he was reassigned as Deputy Commanding General, II Field Force, Vietnam, responsible for the defense of Saigon. He left Vietnam in August 1968. On 5 September 1968 he assumed the dual position of Commandant of the U .S. Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Combat Development Command Institute of Combined Arm$ and Support. This latter position together with his combat experience in Vietnam and earlier assignment with the Weapons System Evaluation Group make General Hay uniquely qualified to be the author of this study. Maj General Hay was also the Commanding General of the XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Gen Hay is also the author of “Fire on the mountain” a story of the 10th Mountain Group. And has been awarded the “Distinguished Service Cross” twice.

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(more…)

A complete oral examination in addition to a thorough professional dental cleaning cannot be performed on an unanesthetized (awake) patient.

Dr. Nossaman’s advanced dentistry training program required additional training in anesthesia and pain management.  This training included attending courses in anesthesia as well as working directly with a board certified anesthesiologist, while completing procedures.  Advanced dental procedures such as root canals or maxillofacial surgery may take several hours to complete; thus, state-of-the-art anesthetic protocols, training and equipment are a must to ensure your pet’s safety.

Safe use of anesthetics requires comprehensive evaluation of each patient beginning with a complete physical exam and includes preanesthetic blood work.  Blood work provides additional information regarding the patients’ ability to be safely anesthetized.  After a complete physical exam and review of bloodwork, Dr. Nossaman will customize the drug dosages used for preanesthesia, induction, maintenance gas anesthesia and pain management for each individual patient.  We do not use the “one size fits all”anesthetic protocol method.

No two patients are the same.  At Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry the only the doctor selects the drugs, determines the correct dosages, and administers the anesthetic drugs to each and every patient!  This is not the case in many practices.

Pet Safety and Comfort

Vital signs monitoring is a must in veterinary patients just as in humans.  The heart rhythm and rate, temperature and respiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide content of the blood as well as the blood pressure must be monitored continually throughout the procedure.

Intravenous fluid therapy delivered by an electronic fluid pump provides the means to maintain normal blood pressure throughout the procedure.  This is important to provide O2 and other nutrients to important organs such as the brain, heart, liver and kidneys.

Maintaining patient temperature is also extremely important.  Our patients are sandwiched in circulating warm water pads with thermostat controlled water pumps, and are additionally covered with a forced warm air blanket.  The result is temperature-controlled warmth for your pet.

At Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry
we take anesthesia very seriously!

Utilizing the most modern technology and most up-to-date anesthetic protocols creates a significant increase in hospital expenses.  Cutting corners by not intubating patients, not keeping patients warm, skimping on pain medications or not properly monitoring anesthesia can save money . . . but significantly decreases the safety and comfort of your pet.

However, Dr. Nossaman believes that you as a concerned pet owner will agree that state-of-the-art equipment, advanced anesthetic drug protocols and increased staff training for the safety and comfort of your pet . . . is worth the additional expense!  Our training and equipment are continually updated to provide the safest anesthesia for your precious pet.

In addition, Dr. Victoria Lukasik, DVM, DACVA, board certified veterinary anesthesiologist is available upon request.

Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry features state-of-the-art anesthetic monitoring equipment with the most reliable and accurate measurements of important parameters affecting your pet’s anesthesia during dental and surgical procedures. We know that anesthesia is a scary prospect and we take every step to ensure the safety and well being of your pet.

Below are a list of measurements and readings that are recorded throughout an anesthetic procedure.

ECG (Electrocardiogram)

  • Continuous reading of the heart rate and rhythm, so that any abnormalities can be addressed in a timely manner
  • Especially critical with any history of heart disease

SPO2 (Oxygen saturation)

  • Continuous reading of oxygen availability to the tissues of the body
  • Important monitor of adequate breathing and lung function during anesthesia

CO2 (Carbon dioxide expelled)

  • Important monitor of adequate breathing and lung function during anesthesia

Blood pressure

  • Monitored to ensure that blood, with oxygen and nutrients, is being delivered to the organs throughout the body for normal function during anesthesia and afterward

Body temperature

  • Hypothermia (low body temperature) is a potential side effect with anesthesia and ensuring adequate body temperature is important for appropriate anesthetic metabolism and quick recovery from anesthesia

Veterinary Dental Radiology

Digital dental radiology is an important tool in diagnosing and treating oral and dental disease. Without dental radiographs, many dental problems can be missed. Dental radiographs help aid in diagnosis, treatment planning, monitoring treatment and post operative treatment success.

Digital dental radiographs are used to view the dental tissues and supporting structures for the teeth. They are also used to identify problems with the crowns and roots of the teeth, as well as supporting the bones and soft tissue. Dental x-rays may be useful to evaluate facial and jaw bones as well as the nasal cavity.

High definition intra oral digital radiographs provide exceptionally clear pictures for better diagnosis and use approximately 90% less than the usual dosage of radiation. Additionally, intra oral digital radiographs require less time to produce quality films, thus decreasing the time that your pet is under anesthesia.

Dental radiography is a very important diagnostic tool used in our practice. Dental x-rays can help with identification of the following conditions:

  • Periodontal disease – dog
  • Periodontal disease – cat
  • Endodontic disease
  • Feline Tooth Resorption (TR)
  • Trauma, maxillary or mandibular fractures, fractured teeth
  • Dental abnormalities
  • Preoperative, perioperative and post operative evaluations
  • Nasal cavity disease
  • Missing teeth
  • Dentigerous Cysts
  • Oral Masses or Tumors
  • Retained Roots
  • Periapical abscesses
  • Genetic dental abnormalities
  • Cavities and Root Resorption
  • Abscessed teeth
  • Permanent tooth count in puppies
  • Retained Deciduous (baby) Teeth
  • Fractured Teeth
  • Dens Invaginatus
  • Malocclusion

Feline Pet Dental Care

Feline Dentistry – Cats are not dogs

Like dogs, cats are affected by periodontal disease and fractured teeth, but in addition their oral problems include tooth resorption and stomatitis (inflammation of the oropharynx).

Like dogs, cats tend to hide pain and are even better than dogs at hiding oral pain. Studies show that animals experience pain similar to humans, but they have evolved not to show signs which would be regarded as weakness by other members of their species or even other species.

Modie in photograph at right with Dr. Nossaman may say that “cats rule . . . and dogs drool!” But unfortunately, some very painful feline dental issues do cause cats to drool.

Tooth Resorption

It is estimated that 60-75% of all mature cats have evidence of feline oral resorptive lesions or tooth resorption. Previously called cat “cavities,” tooth resorption begins at the surface of the tooth where enamel and or cementum (the hard enamel equivalent on the root) is eaten away leaving defects in the tooth. Research has shown that these are not true cavities, and that restoring them (placing a filling) does not stop the resorption process.

Once these defects reach the inner layers of the tooth, cats experience extreme discomfort. (Their jaws may quiver when these areas are probed.). In addition, bacteria found in the mouth may now have access to the blood stream and may infect heart valves, liver and kidneys.

  • Full mouth radiographs are indicated to properly evaluate any cat with tooth resorption.
  • Complete extraction is the treatment of choice.

Teeth with radiographic signs of advanced root resorption and no concurrent periodontal disease may be treated by sub gingival crown amputation. Annual exams are recommended for all mature cats in order to identify tooth resorption. Semi annual dental examinations and annual dental x-rays are recommended for all cats with previous diagnosis of tooth resorption.

Feline Stomatitis

Stomatitis in cats is a severe inflammation or ulceration of the oral tissues. It is frequently debilitating causing:

  • Bad breath
  • Difficulty eating
  • Weight loss
  • Excessive drooling

Some cats with stomatitis
experience so much pain, they may be observed crying out and dropping food when attempting to eat.

Current data suggests that this disorder may have an immune mediated etiology but is generally considered to have many contributing factors. Corticosteroids have been used to provide relief initially but long-term use loses its effectiveness and may even cause diabetes. CO2 laser therapy can be beneficial and provide pain relief to the inflamed tissue.

Cats with feline stomatitis rarely respond to medical treatment without meticulous oral hygiene (difficult to achieve in a cat with a painful mouth). For most cats 80% or more will receive complete cure by extraction of all their teeth. Some cats may require additional medical treatment even after all of the teeth have been removed. Antibiotics may provide some benefit by reducing gingival infection but provide no long-term relief.

Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is one of the most common oral problems identified in cats. Periodontal disease in cats, just like in humans and dogs is caused by the bacteria in plaque. Left on the tooth surface plaque becomes mineralized by calcium salts in saliva. This mineralized debris called calculus or tartar, provides a rough surface for more plaque to adhere. The bacteria in the plaque begins to change to a more virulent form and infects the gums and connective tissue around the teeth.

  • The infection eventually invades the bone holding the tooth in the mouth
  • Eventually the tooth will become loose and fall out, the body’s way of healing the disease
  • This process may take weeks to months causing severe pain and discomfort to the cat.

In addition, bacteria may enter the blood stream and cause damage to heart valves, liver and kidneys.

Cats with periodontal disease may also have concurrent problems like tooth resorption and tooth fractures. Full mouth dental x-rays are indicated for every cat with periodontal disease.

The below intra oral radiograph (x-ray) shows how the infection has caused much of the bone around the tooth to be lost, as well as loss of part of the root.

Cats tend to hide pain, and studies show that they experience pain similar to humans. They have evolved not to show pain and not to show signs which would be regarded as weakness by other members of their species or even other species.

Annual exams are recommended for all cats

Take advantage of our Free Dental Exam
for your feline friend

See here for more photos of the above case involving severe feline periodontal disease, resulting in oral surgery and a full mouth extraction (all teeth removed).

Fractured Canine Teeth

Cats frequently will fracture their canine teeth (fangs). Even a small fracture of the tip may cause pulp exposure as the cats pulp chamber extends very close to the tip.

Pulp exposure provides an entrance for bacteria to invade and invariably leads to infection and death of the pulp tissue. Every fractured tooth should be x-rayed and depending on the results may be treated by extraction or root canal therapy.

See here for more feline dental photos and x-rays for the case (photo at right), which resulted in root canal therapy.

Oral Cancer

Oral tumors have been estimated to account for nearly 10% of all feline cancer. Almost all oral tumors are malignant in cats (90%). There are some masses or oral swellings that may be identified that are benign, such as ostomyelitis or infection of the bone caused by periodontal disease.

All oral masses or swellings should be examined under general anesthesia and full mouth dental x-rays should be obtained. Biopsy may also be indicated and provide useful information directing treatment.

The CO2 laser can be very beneficial in removing some feline oral tumors.

Professional Dental Visit

Every dog and cat professional dental cleaning at Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry includes the following.

  • Pre-anesthetic examination
  • Treatment plan discussion with owner and associated cost
  • Pre-anesthetic blood work
  • Pre-anesthetic assessment
  • Pre-anesthetic electrocardiogram (ECG)
  • Pre-anesthetic sedation
  • Pre-anesthetic pain medication
  • IV catheterization
  • IV fluids
  • Precision IV infusion pump
  • Anesthesia isoflurane
  • Anesthesia monitor – Continuous monitoring of vital signs throughout procedure by doctor and veterinary nurse, in addition to electronic monitoring
  • Anesthesia monitor – Electrocardiogram
  • Anesthesia monitor – Pulse oximetry
  • Anesthesia monitor – C02 measurement
  • Anesthesia monitor – Blood pressure
  • Separate (redundant) respiratory monitors to provide an additional auditory determination
  • Temperature therapy management system
  • – – Circulating warm water blankets to insulate and maintain warm body temperature and comfort
  • Temperature therapy management system
  • – – Forced warm air blanket to maintain warm body temperature and comfort
  • Pre-dentistry intra-oral close-up digital photographs
  • – – Numerous digital photographs of the Dr. Nossaman’s oral findings are viewed on the computer in exam room upon discharge with each client
  • – – Copies of the photographs will be printed and provided to the client to take home and can also be emailed upon request.
  • Oral examination – by Dr. Nossaman
  • – – Patient is under general anesthesia at this time
  • Oral charting of “each tooth” in the mouth – by Dr. Nossaman
  • Occlusal (Bite) Evaluation – by Dr. Nossaman
  • Intra-oral digital radiographs & interpretation
  • – – Minimum of 8 digital radiographs on EVERY PATIENT
  • – – Assessment of dental disease, jaw fractures, and oral tumors
  • – – Intra oral radiographs (x-rays) should always be taken prior to any surgical extraction or root canal procedure
  • – – Digital radiographs are viewed on the computer in exam room and discussed with Dr. Nossaman upon discharge with each client
  • Phone call to owner from Dr. Nossaman to discuss findings from oral examination and digital radiographs
  • Teeth ultrasonic cleaning for Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3 or Stage 4
  • – – Depending on severity of case
  • Teeth polishing
  • Chlorhexidine oral rinse
  • Post dentistry intra-oral close-up digital photographs
  • Patient recovery and nursing care
  • Post dentistry phone call to owner from Dr. Nossaman
  • Complementary – Dental Care Pack
  • Complementary – Oral Rinse
  • Complementary – C.E.T. Enzymatic Toothpaste
  • Complementary – C.E.T. Toothbrush
  • Complementary – Hills T/D Chunks
  • Patient discharge to owner late afternoon and dental home care communication with Dr. Nossaman
  • Post dentistry phone call from Dr. Nossaman that evening after patient arrives home
  • Post dentistry phone call from nurse 1 day after patient arrives home
  • Medical progress examination with Dr. Nossaman as needed

Pain management assessed and provided if required

  • Pre operative (before procedure)
  • Intra operative (during procedure)
  • Post operative (immediately after procedure)
  • Post operative pain medication to go home
  • (As you might imagine, all veterinary clinics DO NOT provide all of the above items or the same level of veterinary care.)

Dental Care Is A Must For Your Pet!

SAVE $100 on Dog and Cat Professional Dental Cleaning through February 2012

The Pet Dentist at Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry provides your pet with a complete array of advanced veterinary dental specialty care services.

  • Comprehensive professional dental cleanings
  • Treatment of periodontal disease
  • Digital dental x-rays
  • Complicated oral surgeries and tooth extractions
  • Feline full mouth extractions
  • Feline dentistry
  • Senior dental care
  • Oral tumor removal
  • Stomatitis treatment
  • Tooth restorations
  • Root canals
  • Metal crowns
  • Jaw fracture repair
  • And other advanced pet dental procedures

Dr. Nossaman is a Veterinary Dental Specialist and Veterinary Dentist and has received extensive advanced veterinary dental training far beyond your family veterinarian in the dental procedures your pet needs. Our Veterinary Dentist provide services similar to your other family dentist, oral surgeon, maxillofacial surgeon, orthodontist, endodontist and periodontist.

What is a Veterinary Dental Specialist and Veterinary Dentist

You brush your teeth twice a day and visit the dentist at least once a year – but does your pet have the same sort of dental care regimen? Clean teeth and a healthy mouth are extremely important for your pet. Plaque and tartar build-up on your pet’s teeth can lead to periodontal disease. If left untreated, periodontal disease can eventually cause other serious health problems in your pet.

This makes dental care a must for your pet.

Due to Dr. Nossaman’s advanced dental training, we treat patients from around the state of Arizona in addition to the local area, including Sedona, Flagstaff, Tucson, Show Low and Payson. We have many happy patients throughout the Phoenix metro area too, including Gilbert, Chandler, Mesa, Tempe, Scottsdale, as well as Cave Creek, Glendale, Peoria, Ahwatukee, Phoenix and Queen Creek, AZ.

See your regular veterinarian for routine veterinary care

. . . but visit Dr. Nossaman for all your pet’s dental care!

 

Did you know that 60 – 70% of the pathology found in our patients mouths occurs under the gum line and may only be identified with dental x-rays.

Dental x-rays are a must! After all, your human dentist doesn’t ask you if you want x-rays during your annual visits. The dentist know they need that information to properly assess and care for your teeth.

 

Call Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry today at 480.497.0505 to schedule a FREE Dental Examination, receive a tour of our dental operatory with a doctor and see the difference.

Expect More!

 

Helping pet’s live longer, healthier lives . . . through advanced oral health care!

Advanced Dog and Cat Dental Services

    • Professional Teeth Cleaning – above and below the gum line and tooth root planing

 

    • Endodontics – Treatment of pulp exposures, fractured teeth, infected pulp canals, and tooth abscesses

 

    • Periodontics – Treatment of disease causing bad breath, discolored teeth or reddened or bleeding gums

 

    • Orthodontics – Correction of painful, incorrect bite alignment and genetic counseling

 

    • Restorations – Treatment to restore the tooth with fillings, crowns or bonding

 

    • Oral Surgery – Complicated and full-mouth extractions, tooth fractures, palatal defects and oral tumor removal via C02 laser surgery

 

    • Maxillofacial Surgery – Fracture repair of the jaw, lymph node staging, salivary gland surgery and tumor removal via C02 laser surgery

 

    • Dental Laser Surgery and Treatment (Less pain and Swelling) – Oral tumor removal, stomatitis treatment, elongated soft palate repair

 

    • Feline Dentistry – Tooth Resorption (TR) and feline stomatitis treatment via C02 laser

 

    • Senior Care – Complete dental care, diagnosis and treatment planning for senior patients

 

    • Emergency Oral Trauma Treatment

 

  • Dental Radiology – Assessment and evaluation of periodontal and endodontal disease, missing teeth, mandibular (jaw) fractures and oral masses

Dental Radiology is Critical

A simple dental infection can eat away at your pet’s health!

More than 8 out of 10 pets over 4 years old suffer from periodontal disease, a condition in which bacteria attack the soft gum tissue. With gum deterioration, bacteria have a clear path to the bloodstream and vital organs, such as kidney, liver, lungs and heart. Even when teeth appear healthy, bacteria can build up in spaces between teeth and gums resulting in extensive periodontal disease. Even tooth root abscesses may not be apparent and may require intra oral radiographs (dental x-rays) to identify. Intra oral radiographs may also be taken for other abnormal dental conditions.

A few examples are:

  • Missing or fractured teeth
  • Bleeding from the gums
  • A tooth that is discolored
  • Feline Odontoclastic Resorptive Lesions (FORL) are present
  • Periodontal disease is present
  • Prior to any surgical extraction

Intra oral radiographs show the inside of the tooth and the root, which lie below the gum line. Intra oral radiographs are critical in determining the health of your pet’s mouth.

See here for photos and more information on the importance of dental x-rays.

 

Dental Information

  • Detailed summary of dog and cat professional dental teeth cleaning visits
  • AAHA Dental Care Guidelines
  • Cat and Dog Dental Charts
  • Anesthesia and Monitoring of Vital Signs
  • Pet Dentistry Client Education
  • Dental Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

 

Dental Procedure Photos

 

  • Restoration – Metal Crowns
  • Oral Surgery and Root Canal – Patient hit by bat
  • Oral Surgery – Feline Full Mouth Extraction
  • Oral Surgery – Oral Tumor and Mandibulectomy
  • Orthodontics – Interceptive Orthodontics
  • Orthodontics – Incline Plane
  • Endodontics – Root Canal
  • Periodontal Disease – Severe * Caution!
  • Persistent Deciduous (baby) Teeth
  • Fractured Teeth
  • Dens Invaginatus
  • Malocclusion Abnormal Tooth Alignment

< < Back to dental information links

Detailed Summary of Dog and Cat Dental Visits

Every dog and cat professional dental cleaning includes the following.

  • Pre-anesthetic examination
  • Treatment plan discussion with owner and associated cost
  • Pre-anesthetic blood work
  • Pre-anesthetic assessment
  • Pre-anesthetic electrocardiogram (ECG)
  • Pre-anesthetic sedation
  • Pre-anesthetic pain medication
  • IV catheterization
  • IV fluids
  • Precision IV infusion pump
  • Anesthesia isoflurane
  • Anesthesia monitor – Continuous monitoring of vital signs throughout procedure by doctor and veterinary nurse, in addition to electronic monitoring
  • Anesthesia monitor – Electrocardiogram
  • Anesthesia monitor – Pulse oximetry
  • Anesthesia monitor – C02 measurement
  • Anesthesia monitor – Blood pressure
  • Separate (redundant) respiratory monitors to provide an additional auditory determination
  • Temperature therapy management system
  • – – Circulating warm water blankets to insulate and maintain warm body temperature and comfort
  • Temperature therapy management system
  • – – Forced warm air blanket to maintain warm body temperature and comfort
  • Pre-dentistry intra-oral close-up digital photographs
  • – – Numerous digital photographs of the Dr. Nossaman’s oral findings are viewed on the computer in exam room upon discharge with each client
  • – – Copies of the photographs will be printed and provided to the client to take home and can also be emailed upon request.
  • Oral examination – by Dr. Nossaman
  • – – Patient is under general anesthesia at this time
  • Oral charting of “each tooth” in the mouth – by Dr. Nossaman
  • Occlusal (Bite) Evaluation – by Dr. Nossaman
  • Intra-oral digital radiographs & interpretation
  • – – Minimum of 8 digital radiographs on EVERY PATIENT
  • – – Assessment of dental disease, jaw fractures, and oral tumors
  • – – Intra oral radiographs (x-rays) should always be taken prior to any surgical extraction or root canal procedure
  • – – Digital radiographs are viewed on the computer in exam room and discussed with Dr. Nossaman upon discharge with each client
  • Phone call to owner from Dr. Nossaman to discuss findings from oral examination and digital radiographs
  • Teeth ultrasonic cleaning for Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3 or Stage 4
  • – – Depending on severity of case
  • Teeth polishing
  • Chlorhexidine oral rinse
  • Post dentistry intra-oral close-up digital photographs
  • Patient recovery and nursing care
  • Post dentistry phone call to owner from Dr. Nossaman
  • Complementary – Dental Care Pack
  • Complementary – Oral Rinse
  • Complementary – C.E.T. Enzymatic Toothpaste
  • Complementary – C.E.T. Toothbrush
  • Complementary – Hills T/D Chunks
  • Patient discharge to owner late afternoon and dental home care communication with Dr. Nossaman
  • Post dentistry phone call from Dr. Nossaman that evening after patient arrives home
  • Post dentistry phone call from nurse 1 day after patient arrives home
  • Medical progress examination with Dr. Nossaman as needed

Pain management assessed and provided if required

  • Pre operative (before procedure)
  • Intra operative (during procedure)
  • Post operative (immediately after procedure)
  • Post operative pain medication to go home
  • For more information on pain management for pet dental procedures, see our Pain Management page

 

(As you might imagine, all veterinary clinics DO NOT provide all of the above items or the same level of veterinary care.)

 

Expect More!

 

Please call us today to schedule a Free Dental Examination and get all your questions answered.

 

< < Back to dental information links

Anesthesia & Monitoring of Vital Signs

Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry features state-of-the-art anesthetic monitoring equipment with reliable and accurate measurements of important parameters affecting your pet’s anesthesia during dental and surgical procedures. We know that anesthesia is a scary prospect and we take every step to ensure the safety and well being of your animal.

  • Anesthesia during dentistry procedures
  • Anesthesia for Senior Pets
  • Pain Management
  • Board Certified Anesthesiologist available upon request

 

< < Back to dental information links

American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Dental Care Guidelines

Dental care guidelines were developed by Board Certified veterinary dentists as members of the AAHA Dental Care Guidelines Task Force to ensure a higher standard of dental care for veterinarians. We at Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry have used the guidelines as a minimum only; in most cases we far exceed this standard of care due to our advanced training and technology.

For more information, see Dental Care Guidelines for Veterinarians and feel free to share the guidelines with your regular veterinarian. Additionally, see AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Pet Owners.

Dental Charts

View Cat and Dog Dental Charts that each client will be given at discharge of their pet

  • Canine dental chart with 42 teeth
  • Feline dental chart with 30 teeth
  • Puppy dental chart with 28 teeth

A special thank you to Dr. Boyd, Dr. Visser and Dr. Coffman for mentoring Dr. Nossaman on the path to become a Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry, as well as, a Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College!

Dr. Robert C. Boyd, DVM
Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College
(Veterinary Dental Specialist or Pet Dentist)
Past President, American Veterinary Dental Society
Past President, Harris County Veterinary Medical Association (Houston, TX)
Veterinary Dental Services
Houston, TX

Dr. Chris J. Visser, DVM
Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College
Diplomate of the European Veterinary Dental College
Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
(Veterinary Dental Specialist or Pet Dentist)

Dr. Curt R. Coffman, DVM
Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College
Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
President, Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
(Veterinary Dental Specialist or Pet Dentist)

and

Dr. Glenn Brigden, DVM
Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College
(Veterinary Dental Specialist or Pet Dentist)

Thank you also to Wendy, Erik and the staff at Arizona Veterinary Dental Specialists (formerly Aid Animal Dental Clinic) for graciously providing training to our doctors and veterinary nurses. Their state of the art instruction in advanced veterinary dentistry allows Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry to offer our patients the absolute best in dental prophylaxis (teeth cleaning), digital radiology, periodontal therapy and oral surgery.

Veterinary Dentistry Organizations

  • Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
  • American Veterinary Dental College
  • American Veterinary Dental Society
  • Journal of Veterinary Dentistry
  • Veterinary Oral Health Council
  • Academy of Veterinary Dental Technicians

 

Arizona Dog and Cat Dentistry has many happy patients throughout the state of Arizona and surrounding cities of Gilbert, Chandler, Mesa, Tempe, Scottsdale, Phoenix and Cave Creek, Apache Junction, and Queen Creek, AZ.

Dog and Cat Dentistry

 

  • Professional Teeth Cleaning – above and below the gum line and tooth root planing

 

  • Endodontics – Treatment of pulp exposures, fractured teeth, infected pulp canals, and tooth abscesses

 

  • Periodontics – Treatment of disease causing bad breath, discolored teeth or reddened or bleeding gums

 

  • Orthodontics – Correction of painful, incorrect bite alignment and genetic counseling

 

  • Restorations – Treatment to restore the tooth with fillings, crowns or bonding

 

  • Oral Surgery – Complicated and full-mouth extractions, tooth fractures, palatal defects and oral tumor removal via C02 laser surgery

 

  • Maxillofacial Surgery – Fracture repair of the jaw, lymph node staging, salivary gland surgery and tumor removal via C02 laser surgery

 

  • Dental Laser Surgery and Treatment (Less pain and Swelling) – Oral tumor removal, stomatitis treatment, elongated soft palate repair

 

  • Feline Dentistry – Tooth Resorption (TR) and feline stomatitis treatment via C02 laser

 

  • Senior Care – Complete dental care, diagnosis and treatment planning for senior patients

 

  • Emergency Oral Trauma Treatment

 

  • Dental Radiology – Assessment and evaluation of periodontal and endodontal disease, missing teeth, mandibular (jaw) fractures and oral masses

 

What is a Board Certified Veterinary Dental Specialist or Veterinary Dentist?

The increased sophistication of veterinary medicine and increasingly important role of pets in our society has resulted in the emergence of a number of veterinary specialties comparable to those in human medicine (e.g., cardiologist, radiologists, surgeons, internists, dermatologists and dentists). Dentistry is one of more than 20 specialties currently recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).

Specialty certification requires completing 3 to 6 years of training in the area of specialization beyond the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. Requirements vary among individual “specialty colleges” but all candidates must pass advanced credential requirements approved by the AVMA. In addition to comprehensive training in the area of expertise, a veterinarian must submit credentials of expertise to a review board in the specialty college. Following acceptance of the credentials, an extensive written and practical examination must be successfully completed before being acknowledged as a specialist.

When these requirements have been met, the applicant is then designated as a “Board Certified Specialist” or “Diplomate” of the respective specialty college. Veterinary dentistry specialty candidates who complete this process can then use the well earned titles, Diplomate of the American Veterinary Dental College, Board Certified Veterinary Dentist, Veterinary Dentist and Veterinary Dental Specialist.

As of 2012, there are only 108 Diplomates of the American Veterinary Dental College,
i.e. Veterinary Dental Specialist and Veterinary Dentist!

What does the Veterinary Dental Specialist do?

Board certified veterinary dental specialists are trained to evaluate genetic as well as acquired problems. Advanced diagnostics, including dental radiology and laboratory evaluations, allow proper diagnosis of the oral health and related medical problems prior to treatment planning.

Since the veterinary dental specialist is trained in surgery, medicine and dentistry, a wide range of special treatment options can be implemented.

Patients with oral health problems usually require general anesthesia for evaluation and treatment. Veterinary dental specialists receive extensive training in the safe and effective use of anesthesia and pain management.

AVDC diplomates are prepared to implement appropriate therapeutic programs to improve oral health and the general wellness of their patients.

Source: American Veterinary Dental College

Visit Advanced Dentistry and Oral Surgery for more information on veterinary dental specialty services and pet dental care for your canine or feline companion. In addition, see Feline Dentistry for cat specific issues.